Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP)

VETERANS-EDUCATIONAL-ASSISTANCE-PROGRAM

Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP)

 

What is VEAP?

 

The Veteran’s Educational Assistance Program, otherwise known as VEAP, offers educational assistance to veterans who have submitted payments into the program throughout the duration of their service. The assistance is available for a number of different educational and training applications, including vocational schools, graduate degrees, hands-on training, flight training, and other programs.

 

How Does VEAP Operate?

 

In order to use your VEAP benefits, you must be actively contributing to the assistance program fund. The number of payments you make into the program will depend on the amount paid on a monthly basis. Once your installments have been made in full, however, your funding is able to last anywhere from one to thirty-six months. Ultimately, the amount of your benefits entitlement is determined by the total of your installments into the VEAP program, and any payments you make into the association’s funding is in turn doubled by the Veteran’s Association. In some instances, DOD payments may actually be included in your payout from the program.

 

How do I Qualify?

 

The Veteran’s Educational Assistance Program is available to honorably discharged veterans who enrolled in service from January 1st, 1977 through June 30th, 1985, and successfully finished their first term of service. Veterans who enlisted between these dates were required to make their first contribution by April 1st, 1987. Contributions are required to be between $25 and $2700. For service members who are currently serving in the force, the VEAP program is now available to active duty service members who are able to contribute three months’ worth of payments for enrollment.

 

To benefit from the VEAP program, VA form 22-1990 (otherwise known as the Application for Education Benefits form) must be completed and submitted to your regional VA office. For service members who are on inactive duty, make four copies of your “Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty Form (Form 214)” must be submitted with your application. On the other hand, active duty service members should expect to have their VA education benefits application accepted and approved by their base’s Education Services Officer, and their enlistment verified by their commanding officer.

7 Comments
  • Alfred McBride
    Posted at 23:00h, 27 November Reply

    1984-1986 I contributed $2700 for the promise made by the Government for $2 to my $1 or about $8100. However I never used it and the VA canceled VEAP and offers me a refund of my $2700. The problem is that $2700 in today’s 2020 purchasing value (3%) is $2.42 to the $1 back then or in other words they owe me $6534! Not just $2700….surely $500 in 1700’s is worth $500000 today…the government..ripped me off..and broke their contract! They didn’t mention they cancelled VEAP..didn’t mention anything about a refund…I found it when trying to get them to honor the deal they made

  • Eric
    Posted at 20:06h, 23 September Reply

    The VEAP education program was simply a joke. A matching amount of 2 for 1 is absurd considering the education benefits provided before and after the time frame when we only had VEAP. I contributed the max amount and received the $10,000 of which I contributed a third…. These Vets, including myself need help in many ways – our student loans will of course be higher – We receive at the most, approx $10,000 compared to over $50,000 and other monetary benefits….. We need help,..
    All military Veterans that were under the VEAP program should have any student loans removed or at least give us the allowance of the difference between any other education program……sad..for sure..

    Eric R.

  • Eric
    Posted at 20:05h, 23 September Reply

    The VEAP education program was simply a joke. A matching amount of 2 for 1 is absurd considering the education benefits provided before and after the time frame when we only had VEAP. I contributed the max amount and received the $10,000 of which I contributed a third…. These Vets, including myself need help in many ways – our student loans will of course be higher – We receive at the most, approx $10,000 compared to over $50,000 and other monetary benefits….. We need help, we need help..
    All military Veterans that were under the VEAP program should have any student loans removed or at least give us the allowance of the difference between any other education program……sad…sad..

    Eric R.

  • David Danielson
    Posted at 11:53h, 04 May Reply

    Certainly a disappointing period for veterans. Military service members didn’t have sufficient means to contribute to their own education due to low pay and the GI Bill was not available – not transferred. This is a good example of what President Trump has mentioned repeatedly; we don’t take good care of our veterans. It is my opinion ion that military members during the early 80’s and there families should be provided the GI Bill.

  • Clark Keppler
    Posted at 19:01h, 07 September Reply

    I was in the Army when there was no GI Bill 1981 -1984. Only the VEAP Program. Were Veterans who fell through this window, who were not able to receive GI Bill benefits, like all the Veterans before and after that period were, ever able to be transferred to the GI Bill?

  • ivan amador
    Posted at 18:21h, 22 July Reply

    I am a beneficiary of a veteran. I am trying to get help thru the Hazelwood application. they lead me to this website but I cant find a way to make an account or direct link to input information regarding a certification of eligibility paper needed by the veterans association needed by my school, South Texas College. if u can further assist me.

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